Articles – Tis Not the Season For Spending

I spend a good three hours writing articles that only one or two people end up seeing. So, I might as well post the ones I’m proud of here, no matter what cp style says. Here’s my one on Christmas Spending, uneditted, because I don’t really care anymore.

Heading into the end of November, the Eaton Centre is rife with activity. Shoppers buzz in and out of stores, looking for the perfect item. Some are simply taking the time to go window shopping with loved ones.  Not much has changed from last year, not even the amount of money they’re spending.

“I’ll be spending about the same. Why not? I don’t really see the need for more stuff,” says Pete Bradbury, a home project manager for a construction company, who was waiting with his six months old son outside the Gap. “If anything we might spend less on the rest of the family and more on him.”

Canadians just aren’t feeling the urge to splurge this year. According to a survey done by Deloitte, a little over half of Canadians don’t intend to spend more than last year. The remaining half says they will spend less. A small minority, 4 per cent, say they’ll be buying a little more this year. Overall the report predicts most Canadians will be careful with their Christmas budgets.

Greg Morris is a student at George Brown’s general arts program. He was browsing through video game strategy guides in HMV. He would pick one up, search for some tidbit of information and then put it back where he found it. He says he’ll be in the second category, and try to keep some of his pennies.

“Tuition sucks you dry. I had a job but I quit it because of school. It was either school or work, and I have to prioritize.”

Graduates have a similar problem. “It’ll be a little bit less this year. I’m trying to pay off student debt at the moment. I’ve got a tight budget this year,” explained Rachel Van Geest, who currently works as an office administrator. “[My family] usually spends a good day exchanging gifts, but I guess I’ll have a little less to offer.”

Spending less or the same doesn’t have to be a bad thing. Only a few metres away from Bradbury and his son, Emmett Ishak grinned as he played with his young daughter. She ran in a circle, waiting for her father to catch her. He eventually grabs her and then hoisters her into the air. “We’ve never been a things family. This is only my second Christmas in Canada since I came from Malaysia. I’m pretty comfortable with the way things are.”

By the same token, real value can come out of spending more. Dwayne Daniel sat, tired, beside a drained fountain in the Eaton Centre. He is a visitor from the Caribbean and a pastor in his home parish. He claimed he will be among the few people in Canada spending more this Christmas than last year.

“Christmas is about love right? So if you care about the world, you’ll give more to others as you grow. I spend the entire year helping people, but I like to give as much as I can [on Christmas].”

Awww. If only every article ended on an anecdote about love. If only writing this didn’t make my cold, cold heart vomit.

 

Only a few metres away from Bradbury and his son, Emmett Ishak grinned as he played with his young daughter. She ran in circle, waiting for her father to catch her. They laugh as he wrapped his arms around her and then hoisters her into the air. “We’ve never been a things family. This is only my second Christmas in Canada since I came from Malaysia. I’m pretty comfortable with the way things are.”

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Posted on November 22, 2010, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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